Test it yourself.

Just embrace the inevitable.  I’m going to be inviting you—my readers—to write about your own experiences using the Dale Carnegie principles.  You don’t need great skills at writing.  You don’t need to have taken the Dale Carnegie course.  If you’ve read at least a couple of my blog posts you get the idea of what the Dale Carnegie principles are about.

Duck, duck, duck…GOOSE! (Also known as tag… you’re it!)

Track me down via email, via comments, on Facebook or in person to discuss your story.  I will help you do the rest.

Why should you do this?  I can probably come up with 101 reasons—but I’ll name just a few:

  • It’s fun.
  • You get your 15 minutes of fame…who knows maybe even longer.
  • You can prove to yourself whether or not the Dale Carnegie principles work.
  • It’s better than sitting on the sofa watching television.
  • For the status of saying you are a contributing writer to the coolest blog in town (The Smiling Daffodil’s 365 Days of Living the Dale Carnegie Principles, of course)
  • For the satisfaction of knowing you implemented a Dale Carnegie principle in your life.

I know what you’re thinking… you don’t know the principles.  Lucky you—I’ve selected some principles below.  Pick among these or contact me and I’ll give you the complete list.

From How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie:
Principle 1.  Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.
Principle 2.  Give honest, sincere appreciation.
Principle 5.  Smile.
Principle 7.  Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.
Principle 17.  Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.
Principle 25.  Ask questions instead of giving direct orders.

From How to Stop Worrying and Start Living by Dale Carnegie:

  • Get all the facts.
  • Keep busy.
  • Don’t fuss about trifles.
  • Decide just how much anxiety a thing may be worth and refuse to give it more.
  • Expect ingratitude.
  • Count your blessings—not your troubles.
  • Create happiness for others.
  • Rest before you get tired.
  • Put enthusiasm into your work.

As far as I can determine, I’ve responded to all the conceivable hesitations you might have for not participating.  Actually, there’s one more excuse you might come up with: “but my stories aren’t interesting, I don’t have anything to say… people won’t ‘get’ my stories.”  My response to this hesitation:  The Smiling Daffodil is writing about a trip to Church’s Fried Chicken.  I am certain you can top that!

Looking forward to hearing from you.  :)

- The Smiling Daffodil

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